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Frill plant issue

PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2014 9:46 am
by rwfishguy
Ok, I am no plant keeping specialist and try to get hardy and easy to keep plants.

I have a Frill plant that has an issue that I found perplexing. It has lost all the leaves and has only the stalk remaining.
No, they were not eaten by fish as all the leaves created a mess to strain out from the water. I still have not removed all of them.

What would cause this type of problem? Was it that I had to turn up the heat in the tank to 84 to prevent a suspected ich outbreak?

Is it that I added Flourish to the water to help the plants? Or the Paraguard?

Finally, with just the stalk dangling around in the water, should I just remove it and start over? Or will it grow back? I have clippings I can get from my other aquarium and restart the plant.

Rob

Re: Frill plant issue

PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2014 10:59 am
by ScottFish
I haven't heard of a Frill plant. Is this is it?: http://www.petsmart.com/gsi/webstore/WF ... U=36-15152

Re: Frill plant issue

PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2014 9:40 pm
by rwfishguy
Yes, that is it. I have it floating. I did not get it at Pet Smart, and they still called it the same thing.

Rob

Re: Frill plant issue

PostPosted: Thu Mar 20, 2014 10:06 am
by asukawashere
I've never heard of a Myriophyllum referred to as a "frill plant" either, but then I don't pay a ton of attention to common names. I doubt it's the heat that did it, as most myrios can tolerate temps in the mid-80s for at least a little while. Generally, though, I wouldn't quite classify any Myriophyllum as an easy/hardy plant—while they're not terribly difficult to culture, and they're not very picky about water parameters, they do generally require stronger lighting than the plants typically considered "easy"—in short, my first inclination on hearing about a melt is to ask what kind of lighting you've got on this tank.

That said, plants do sometimes drop their leaves on introduction to a new environment, regardless of its suitability. If the stems are still green and otherwise healthy-looking, I'd give them awhile and see if they do grow some new leaves. Floating them is a good idea if they're having a rough time adjusting, as it allows them access to the brightest light possible and atmospheric CO2.

Re: Frill plant issue

PostPosted: Thu Mar 20, 2014 1:05 pm
by rwfishguy
Fluorescent lighting for plants. I generally try to purchase low light and hardy plants. The man at the LST thought it would live in my two set ups. And they have done very well, until the problem I just described. My other tank they are doing well in, but that gets a lot of sun light.

It grows pretty rapidly.

Re: Frill plant issue

PostPosted: Sun Mar 23, 2014 9:42 am
by Crazygar
Myrio does well in cooler waters with flow on the leaves (this prevents algae from attacking the plant). When I first started back into Plants, I loved my Myrio and it took a couple of bunches to figure out why I was cooking it and not supplying loads of light (what it really needs).

Once I changed my water temperature and increased the lighting (to be seen from space) it took off like a weed.

Gary

Re: Frill plant issue

PostPosted: Tue Mar 25, 2014 4:34 pm
by asukawashere
Lighting is definitely the issue here—your sunny tank has enough light to grow it without difficulties, but a tank lit by one or two simple fluorescent (T8?) bulbs isn't going to cut it. "Low light" is not a description I'd attach to any myrio. Normally I'd suggest some similar-looking alternatives to consider at this point, but there aren't a whole ton of really feathery-leaved plants with low lighting needs; the limited surface area of their leaves means every cell has to work overtime to produce enough energy for the rest of the plant... some are, of course, needier than others. Limnophila aquatica isn't that terrible (the U.S.-illegal L. sessiliflora is even easier, though), and I've seen Cabomba c. palaeformis grown in subpar lighting (it does get a bit leggy), but the only truly low-light plant I can think of that has fine, furcated foliage is hornwort... and that doesn't really resemble myrio unless you squint from a long distance LOL.

Re: Frill plant issue

PostPosted: Sun Mar 30, 2014 8:51 am
by Crazygar
Hornwort will dissolve quickly in warm waters, always keep that in cool water.

Yeah, Myrio would be a high light plant, and is often sold in the Petstores wonderfully bushy, look where the lighting is when purchasing and also remember you buying directly from a "Plant Farm", so it's going to be looking its best when purchasing.

T5HO system and you'll be ok with Myrio, remember the flow!

Gary

Re: Frill plant issue

PostPosted: Sun Mar 30, 2014 3:46 pm
by rwfishguy
It is not growing back that I can see. Just lone stalks floating still.



Rob

Re: Frill plant issue

PostPosted: Sun Mar 30, 2014 4:44 pm
by Crazygar
You may need to get more, Myrio is considered in my books, a higher maintenance plant.

Gary

Re: Frill plant issue

PostPosted: Sun Mar 30, 2014 6:08 pm
by freshfish
You running any CO2 or dosing Excel on this tank to supplement carbon? When you increase lighting over a tank, you also have to increase nutrient supply for the plants (otherwise it's like sending a weight lifter to the gym to bulk up while keeping him on a clear liquid diet... you're gonna end up with a sickly-looking weight lifter and sickly-looking plants too!)

I never had any luck with Myrio (or Cabomba either, for that matter) in low tech/low light tanks.