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Article - DIY Faucet Pump

PostPosted: Fri Dec 07, 2007 12:22 am
by J.B.
It seems like every time I use my Python™ Clean-n-Fill system, I'm always concerned about the brittle, plastic faucet pump breaking or cracking. One modification a lot of Python™ users do is change out the white plastic adapter in favor of the brass one since the white plastic one supplied will strip out pretty easily. However, most people talk about the Python™ breaking at the funnel piece, so I decided to recreate the pump in its entirety.

Before I started this DIY project, I thoroughly inspected the Python™ faucet pump to truly understand what makes it work. The first thing that stood out to me was the funnel piece where most of them break. It was immediately apparent that this piece was absolutely necessary. (see Figure 1)

Figure 1
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The reason this piece stood out to me is 1.) it is funnel shaped, thus narrowing the path of the water and creating a jet of water flowing through the pump, thus creating the siphon effect and 2.) it fits down into the top of the faucet pump and forces the water coming from the faucet to bypass the side port/exit of the pump. (see Figures 2, 3 & 4)

Figure 2
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Figure 3
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Figure 4
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After looking over the rest of the pump, I deduced that this particular piece of the pump is the most important part of the pump and must somehow be mimicked in my project. (Yeah, I was thinking the same thing; "how in world am I going to re-create this apparent critical piece with stuff I have laying around?")

Well, thankfully Preston took care of that problem for me! Included in a radiator universal flush and fill kit I had out in the storage shed was a little rubber piece that appeared to be a perfect fit. (see Figure 5)

Figure 5
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Also included were three different sized "T" junctions; 1/2, 3/4 & 5/8. I took notice that these "T" junctions look similar to the faucet pump body of the Python™. I ended up using the 3/4 "T" junction for this project. (see Figure 6)

Figure 6
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So after I found those little jewels, I gathered up the tools and other parts and pieces I would need for this DIY project. Here are the necessary tools I used: flat-head screwdriver, phillips-head screwdriver and a razor knife. Here is the remainder of the parts I used:

(1) 5/8 male hose end
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(1) 5/8 female hose end
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(1) cap for male end of hose
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8" piece of 3/4" OD x 5/8" ID clear hose
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I also used (2) 1" metal hose clamps (see Figure 7) for a pic of all supplies used.

Figure 7
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To start this project, I had to trim the lip of the rubber piece to the size of the "T" junction so the hose would fit over it. I also made the opening a bit bigger because I figured the small slit would make too much pressure and splatter water everywhere(see Figure 8 )

Figure 8
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Next I attached one end of the hose to the "T" junction over the trimmed rubber part. (see Figure 9)

Figure 9
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To keep everything in place, slide a metal 1" hose clamp over the hose and tighten. (see Figure 10)

Figure 10
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Next you'll put the female hose end on the other end of the hose and clamp it down with the supplied hose clamp. (see Figure 11)

Important Note: ensure you put the female end above the rubber (funnel) part as this is the side that will connect to the faucet and you need the water to go through the rubber part.

Figure 11
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Next you'll attach another section of hose to the other end of the "T" junction along with the second metal hose clamp and tighten it down. (see Figure 12) You can make these hose pieces as long as you want, I cut mine just long enough where the hose end butted right up against the "T" junction. The sink I use during water changes is pretty shallow, so I was limited on the length I could make this pump.

Figure 12
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Lastly, I placed the male hose end on and tightened the supplied clamp. (see Figure 13)

Figure 13
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That completes this project and it actually looks pretty good. Once the faucet adapter is applied, this DIY pump is about 2" longer than the Python™ pump. (see Figures 14 & 15)

This project works just like the Python™ except when refilling the tank. When you need to refill, you'll have to screw the cap onto the male end of the pump to force the water out to the hose. I tried this pump and it doesn't leak a bit and works like a charm, providing quite a bit more suction/siphon than the brittle, plastic Python™ pump. Not to mention, once you purchase a brass faucet adapter, you'd be pretty hard pressed to do any damage to this project. You can easily make this DIY project for under $15, and it's well worth it if you ask me.

Figure 14
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Figure 15
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If you have any questions about this DIY project feel free to PM me and I'll try to answer any question you may have.

Happy DIYing!

PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2007 6:44 pm
by J.B.
One thing I found out when doing my WCs with it today is, it is too well sealed. When you turn the ball valve to the off position, it builds up quite a bit of pressure and unlike the commercial Python™ pump it has no where to go. :shock: That is, until it blows the bottom hose mender off. :biglaugh: So, I just lowered the pressure and it worked fine.

I was asked by one of the members to post some pictures of the DIY project in action, so here they are.

Here is the pump attached to the faucet
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Here it is with the hose attached
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Here the faucet is ON, priming the siphon
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Closer shot of the same thing, faucet ON
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Faucet OFF to show flow
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Closer pic of flow with faucet off
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Obviously your mileage will vary depending on elevation of the sink/faucet in comparison to the tank elevation. Good luck!