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Gwennbrook Farms Discus Food Recipe!

PostPosted: Sat Jul 07, 2007 4:07 pm
by MaryPa
:shock: Dang I only have 2 Discus. Can someone break this down for just 2 tiny Discus` food??
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Our Discus Food Recipe

350 pounds of turkey hearts
150 pounds of turkey livers
100 pounds of peeled shrimp
50 pounds of fish fillets (non oily fish)
32 pounds of green beans or peas (food for plecos)
20 pounds of fish flake food (to help bind food)
10 pounds of oatmeal
Thaw all frozen ingredients to remove water and blood.
Cook the hearts, liver, fish and shrimp
Grind the hearts, liver, fish and shrimp
Mix all the ingredients together
Grind the final mixture and put into plastic bags. Flatten mixture in bags to remove air and then store in freezer.
Thaw before feeding to your discus.



Other Recommended Foods for your Discus

Frozen Hikari Blood Worms
Tetra Bits (soak in water for a few minutes before feeding)
Frozen or Live Adult Brine Shrimp
Mosquito Larvae
Daphnia (great for small fry)
White Worms
Mysis Shrimp
Chopped up Red Worms
Glass Worms
A beef-turkey heart/fish/shrimp mixture should be the main diet of your discus. Use other recommended foods as a supplement to vary your fishes diet. Try to avoid feeding freeze-dried foods or flake foods as their main diet if you really want your discus to grow.

PostPosted: Sat Jul 07, 2007 4:44 pm
by kelly.belle
It is still alot but I hope this gets it down to a managable amount.

4.5 pounds of turkey hearts
2 pounds of turkey livers
1.5 pounds of peeled shrimp
10 ounces of fish fillets (non oily fish)
6.5 ounces of green beans or peas (food for plecos)
4 ounces of fish flake food (to help bind food)
2 ounces of oatmeal

PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2007 6:40 pm
by Dkarc
I wouldnt bother trying to replicate such a complicated recipe for only a few discus. Make it easier on yourself and better for the fish by leaving out all the vegetable/plant matter (no peas, oatmeal, etc) . It is proven fact that discus are carnivorous, rather than omnivores as previously thought. Here is a simple recipe that works well:

1/2 pound 97% super lean ground beef (cant get much leaner than this)
1/2 pound filet of cod, sole (any white fish...or equivalent in shrimp meat...no tails/shell, raw).
1/2 teaspoon of pure spirulina powder (used purely for vitamin/mineral content...can be found at local health food store).
Small handful of flake food to bind it (dont add too much as it can make the food too tough for the fish to actually eat it).

Grind everything up in either a food processor or meat grinder. For a meat grinder send whole mixture through several times to get to a fine consistency. You want it so that it is sticky, but not tough....so only add enough flake food to get it that way. Oh, and all ingredients are raw...no cooking any of the meats.

This is an extremely basic recipe that works fairly well for growing out young fry. It's not my personal recipe I use in my hatchery, nor is it perfect, but it does its job for the beginning hobbyist. Plus, there isnt a whole lot in there to foul the tank if it falls apart in the water.

-Ryan
Orlando Discus

PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2007 6:44 pm
by Dkarc
Oh, and you can always supplement their diet with just about any kind of commercial dry or frozen food. They can be trained to eat flake, pellets, and just about any frozen foods too. Bloodworms, brine shrimp, BH and other frozen foods work great as well.

-Ryan
Orlando Discus

PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2007 8:34 pm
by MaryPa
For now they`re eating Discus pellets, frozen Discus food,frozen Brine shrimp,frozen Blood worms, Cichlid flakes and Tetra Color Granuals. I`ll try the recipe you gave me it`s sounds easier than the one Gwennbrook feeds. I do have access to beef heart so i`ll most likely go ahead and use that instead of the ground beef.
One question is bothering me, why do people tell me Discus need wormed twice a year? How would they pick up parasites in my aquarium?

PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2007 10:20 pm
by Dkarc
MaryPa wrote:For now they`re eating Discus pellets, frozen Discus food,frozen Brine shrimp,frozen Blood worms, Cichlid flakes and Tetra Color Granuals. I`ll try the recipe you gave me it`s sounds easier than the one Gwennbrook feeds. I do have access to beef heart so I`ll most likely go ahead and use that instead of the ground beef.
One question is bothering me, why do people tell me Discus need wormed twice a year? How would they pick up parasites in my aquarium?


That issue (worming) is a huge topic that if I start to discuss here, it'll open up a huge can of worms (no pun intended). IMO, worming the fish is termed in 3 different ways....all of which are defined differently by everyone. There is using Prazi, metro, and panacur (flubendazole, levaimsole, etc)....all of which 3 treat something different internally in the fish. Prazi for tapeworms, metro for internal flagellates, and panacur (flubendazole, levamisole, etc) are for nematodes (roundworms). In my own hatchery, I do treat all my breeding stock twice a year with panacur for prophylactic reasons. But on my fry, I only treat if necessary. In the hobbyists tank, I would only treat if necessary. So to answer your question....no, there is not a need to deworm the fish twice a year. You could deworm them now just to get rid of anything , and treat again 1 week later to catch anything that just hatched (since dewormers dont affect the eggs). Now if you feed live foods, then treating for nematodes/roundworms as well as tapeworms twice a year is a good idea.

-Ryan
Orlando Discus

PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2007 7:28 am
by MaryPa
I don`t feed live foods so what would be the best wormer to use now since I don`t know if they`ve ever been wormed? Thanks for your help Ryan. If I ever get to Florida,yeah right like my DH would travel that far. My Discus also thank you. :) .

PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2007 12:03 pm
by Lisachromis
Dkarc wrote:I wouldnt bother trying to replicate such a complicated recipe for only a few discus. Make it easier on yourself and better for the fish by leaving out all the vegetable/plant matter (no peas, oatmeal, etc) . It is proven fact that discus are carnivorous, rather than omnivores as previously thought.

-Ryan
Orlando Discus


Ryan,

What about all the stomach content studies done on wild discus? There's an awful lot of 'veggie' matter in their diet.

PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2007 12:23 pm
by AquaCare
Dkarc wrote:Make it easier on yourself and better for the fish by leaving out all the vegetable/plant matter (no peas, oatmeal, etc) . It is proven fact that discus are carnivorous, rather than omnivores as previously thought. -Ryan
Orlando Discus


Sorry, but I have to agree wholeheartedly with Lisachromis on this one. It's not a proven fact at all, as she's pointed out, wild discus carry considerable plant matter in their gut. One on the convenient points of keeping discus in heavily planted aquariums as I do is that I don't have to supplement their diet with additional plant plant matter, as they spend much of their time happily grazing away. The only time I can think of that they go strictly carnivore is during the height of the dry season when they're stuck in an acid pool with no plant matter available, which makes insect and insect larvae the only food available.

PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2007 3:04 pm
by Dkarc
There are several articles out on the internet now that show discus fair much better on a carnivorus diet, rather than omnivorus (better growth, etc). There is one in particular that is very good on http://www.dph.nl. I cant post up a link as the owner there doesnt like when people do that. I'll see if I can find it elsewhere. But for now, register there and look for it yourself, its in the forum under the "discus nutrition archives". In the article it said that they can use plant matter protein, but they do better on other forms of protein (non-plant based). And I have to agree with the article. I get far better growth rate and spawning/hatch rate when my fish are fed a carnivorous type diet compared to one with plant matter in it. they just do better. And as far as the content of the stomachs in wild discus....I think its just what was available to them. JMO+JME

-Ryan

PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2007 7:23 pm
by AquaCare
Dkarc wrote: And as far as the content of the stomachs in wild discus....I think its just what was available to them. JMO+JME

-Ryan


Hmmm, with the Amazon being loaded with insects, larvae, and benthic invertebrate as it is, I just don't see that being the case. And as I said in my own tanks where they have the choice, they split up their food groups pretty evenly all by themselves quite naturally. Of course it all depends on how a person defines "they just do better". If you're looking at discus as a commodity and a product, then yes a high protein diet is going to put on growth and get them to market sooner, and of course condition them for rapid fire spawning at a much greater rate. What I'd be curious to see is how they do in the long term and in what percentage on such a diet.

PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2007 10:38 pm
by Dkarc
If what you mean is how long do they live....My oldest fish I have I got from a friend when it was 6 years old (bred and raised by him)....that was 3 years ago. His diet was very similar to mine and still the same. The only variation I have in my hatchery diet is frozen bloodworms about once a week. That fish just died about 3 months back. So 9 years of age isnt too shabby for a discus. There are others who may live just a bit longer, but 9-10 years seems about average for a healthy discus. And no, no necropsy was performed to look at internal organs. It works for me, and many others in the hobby.

-Ryan

PostPosted: Sat Jul 14, 2007 2:33 pm
by AquaCare
Dkarc wrote:If what you mean is how long do they live....My oldest fish I have I got from a friend when it was 6 years old (bred and raised by him)....that was 3 years ago. His diet was very similar to mine and still the same. The only variation I have in my hatchery diet is frozen bloodworms about once a week. That fish just died about 3 months back. So 9 years of age isnt too shabby for a discus. There are others who may live just a bit longer, but 9-10 years seems about average for a healthy discus. And no, no necropsy was performed to look at internal organs. It works for me, and many others in the hobby.

-Ryan


So as not to derail this thread any worse than it already is (sorry Mary), I'll just make one more comment (keeping it as food related as I can) and invite you to start another thread if you'd like so that this one can go back to discus food recipes.

If my discus were only living 9-10 years, I'd be concerned. As it is, mine average about 14, some quite a bit older than that, but when they hit 14-15 I know the time I have left to enjoy them is getting short. I wouldn't consider saying that food is the key, rather just one of the keys. I think we could all agree that eating a balanced diet can contribute to both health and longevity in any species. But it's balanced nutrition, environment, and husbandry all working together that keeps any animal healthy and happy. Remove any one or part of that equation and the animal suffers in the long run.

IMO, keep the vegetable matter available. It doesn't have to be a lot, it won't hurt a thing, and it's not even much of an inconvenience.

PostPosted: Sat Jul 14, 2007 2:59 pm
by Callen
AquaCare wrote:So as not to derail this thread any worse than it already is (sorry Mary), I'll just make one more comment (keeping it as food related as I can) and invite you to start another thread if you'd like so that this one can go back to discus food recipes.

If my discus were only living 9-10 years, I'd be concerned. As it is, mine average about 14, some quite a bit older than that, but when they hit 14-15 I know the time I have left to enjoy them is getting short. I wouldn't consider saying that food is the key, rather just one of the keys. I think we could all agree that eating a balanced diet can contribute to both health and longevity in any species. But it's balanced nutrition, environment, and husbandry all working together that keeps any animal healthy and happy. Remove any one or part of that equation and the animal suffers in the long run.

IMO, keep the vegetable matter available. It doesn't have to be a lot, it won't hurt a thing, and it's not even much of an inconvenience.


AC this make perfect sense...because what we are tyring to achieve here is to give our fish a well balanced diet and as close to what they would eat in the wild to give them a long healthy life. Whether you make your own or buy fish food it still all comes down to making it a healthy diet. And your right it all works together... balanced nutrition, environment, and good husbandry is the key to happy healthy fish that we can enjoy for years to come. :)

PostPosted: Sat Jul 14, 2007 3:21 pm
by kelly.belle
AquaCare wrote:IMO, keep the vegetable matter available. It doesn't have to be a lot, it won't hurt a thing, and it's not even much of an inconvenience.

I agree. There is very little veg matter as compared to animal protein matter. With the lower quantities that I divided out, there is only 12.5oz veg to almost 9lbs of animal meat.